Atlas de Anatomia do Corpo Humano - Central

The atlas of human body

Coronary Vessels
Coronary Vessels

The veins and arteries of the HEART.

Venules
Venules

The minute vessels that collect blood from the capillary plexuses and join together to form veins.

Veins
Veins

The vessels carrying blood away from the capillary beds.

Cranial Sinuses
Cranial Sinuses

Large endothelium-lined venous channels situated between the two layers of DURA MATER, the endosteal and the meningeal layers. They are devoid of valves and are parts of the venous system of dura mater. Major cranial sinuses include a postero-superior group (such as superior sagittal, inferior sagittal, straight, transverse, and occipital) and an antero-inferior group (such as cavernous, petrosal, and basilar plexus).

Cavernous Sinus
Cavernous Sinus

An irregularly shaped venous space in the dura mater at either side of the sphenoid bone.

Transverse Sinuses
Transverse Sinuses

The two large endothelium-lined venous channels that begin at the internal occipital protuberance at the back and lower part of the CRANIUM and travels laterally and forward ending in the internal jugular vein (JUGULAR VEINS). One of the transverse sinuses, usually the right one, is the continuation of the SUPERIOR SAGITTAL SINUS. The other transverse sinus is the continuation of the straight sinus.

Superior Sagittal Sinus
Superior Sagittal Sinus

The long large endothelium-lined venous channel on the top outer surface of the brain. It receives blood from a vein in the nasal cavity, runs backwards, and gradually increases in size as blood drains from veins of the brain and the DURA MATER. Near the lower back of the CRANIUM, the superior sagittal sinus deviates to one side (usually the right) and continues on as a TRANSVERSE SINUS.

Coronary Sinus
Coronary Sinus

A short vein that collects about two thirds of the venous blood from the MYOCARDIUM and drains into the RIGHT ATRIUM. Coronary sinus, normally located between the LEFT ATRIUM and LEFT VENTRICLE on the posterior surface of the heart, can serve as an anatomical reference for cardiac procedures.

Portal System
Portal System

A system of vessels in which blood, after passing through one capillary bed, is conveyed through a second set of capillaries before it returns to the systemic circulation. It pertains especially to the hepatic portal system.

Splenic Vein
Splenic Vein

Vein formed by the union (at the hilus of the spleen) of several small veins from the stomach, pancreas, spleen and mesentery.

Portal Vein
Portal Vein

A short thick vein formed by union of the superior mesenteric vein and the splenic vein.

Mesenteric Veins
Mesenteric Veins

Veins which return blood from the intestines; the inferior mesenteric vein empties into the splenic vein, the superior mesenteric vein joins the splenic vein to form the portal vein.

Umbilical Veins
Umbilical Veins

Venous vessels in the umbilical cord. They carry oxygenated, nutrient-rich blood from the mother to the FETUS via the PLACENTA. In humans, there is normally one umbilical vein.

Axillary Vein
Axillary Vein

The venous trunk of the upper limb; a continuation of the basilar and brachial veins running from the lower border of the teres major muscle to the outer border of the first rib where it becomes the subclavian vein.

Azygos Vein
Azygos Vein

A vein which arises from the right ascending lumbar vein or the vena cava, enters the thorax through the aortic orifice in the diaphragm, and terminates in the superior vena cava.

Cerebral Veins
Cerebral Veins

Veins draining the cerebrum. Cerebral Angiography;

Venae Cavae
Venae Cavae

The inferior and superior venae cavae.

Vena Cava, Inferior
Vena Cava, Inferior

The venous trunk which receives blood from the lower extremities and from the pelvic and abdominal organs.

Vena Cava, Superior
Vena Cava, Superior

The venous trunk which returns blood from the head, neck, upper extremities and chest. Superior Vena Cava Syndrome;

Femoral Vein
Femoral Vein

The vein accompanying the femoral artery in the same sheath; it is a continuation of the popliteal vein and becomes the external iliac vein.

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